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What constitutes the crime of assault in Texas?

On Behalf of | Mar 23, 2021 | Assault |

After a busy day at the office, you might hit up happy hour at your favorite bar during which you may encounter some trouble with another person. Misunderstandings can lead to angry words, and before you know it the situation becomes physical and you are accused of committing assault. The following is a brief overview of assault laws in Texas.

How does Texas define assault?

Many states have different laws for assault and the separate crime of battery. In these states, assault occurs when a person threatens someone else with imminent bodily injury, while battery involves actual offensive or injurious physical contact. However, in Texas there is simply the crime of assault that encompasses both assault and battery, although there are many degrees of the crime of assault. For example, under Texas law a person commits assault in the following offenses:

  • A person commits assault if they intentionally, knowingly or recklessly cause injurious harm to another, including the person’s spouse;
  • A person commits assault if they intentionally or knowingly threaten another with imminent injurious contact, including the person’s spouse; or
  • Intentionally or knowingly cause physical that they know or reasonably believe would be offensive or provocative.

As you can see, there are a variety of ways a person in Texas can commit assault.

What are the classifications of assault in Texas?

There are a variety of classifications of assault in Texas, ranging from a Class C misdemeanor to a first-degree felony based on the threat, contact or person the threat or contact is directed at. There is also the related crime of aggravated assault. A person commits aggravated assault if the contact results in serious injury or a weapon is used in the commission of the alleged crime.

Learn more about assault in Texas

This is only a basic overview of the crime of assault in Texas. It is for educational purposes only and does not contain legal advice. Those who want to learn more about the crime of assault in Texas are encouraged to explore our firm’s website for further information.